Loughrigg Fell from Ambleside – Ambleside – Easter Sunday 8th April – Week 3

Smaller alternative to the big mountains but with all the charm.

So what do you do on Easter Sunday? The weather has returned a wintery reminder of what April is supposed to feel like. Showers and dismal looking clouds on the move to find someone else to drench. I guess that’s the thing about putting a walk diary together. It’s often said if you want to be sure your are going to do something then you should write it down at least because until you do it’s just an idea.  As many S.M.A.S.H. companions may have learned that’s it unwise to forecast the days weather based on what one sees from the cosy confines behind their bedroom window. To be fair, for a moment I had second thoughts about making a move into the grey outside that I woke to on Sunday morning. It’s always a different matter once you cross the Pennines, the arched spine of the country that gives rise to two weather systems, one either side. I reminded myself of this and gathered the last of the necessities and pressed the lot into the car boot and made for our normal meeting place.  My walking possie today was a small handful of friends and family. Keith, keen to pop his SMASH cherry having kept abreast of our outings during his time in Dubai and just about anywhere else you can imagine at least where you can get an internet connection. Keith had been bigging his mum up about her extraordinary walking ability earlier in the week and enquired as to whether she could be considered able enough. Well we shall just have to see. Jean was soon being referred to in mind mind at least as Keen Jean. She’s one of those naturally energetic looking people. Sat in the passenger seat wound like a spring ready to go dressed in a casual easy to move about in kind of way.The rest of the crew were home brewed. Lesley and the small people. Jack and Emily didn’t even enquire as to where we were going, they just know they are going for a walk and they love it when new faces turn out so they can show them how to go on and tell them what they’ve done so far.

St.Mary’s church on Vicarage Road into Rothay Park

We set off at 08:15 and arrived in Ambleside at 10:15 booted, bagged and baited at 10:30 as well as robbed on a bank holiday for parking, but in Rydal Road carpark that was quickly begining to fill was a heafty revenue not to be missed by the local council I guess.

Loughrigg is to Ambleside what Catbells is to Keswick in that it brings out all the families  keen to tick off their first proper mountain and fell runners out for a mild challenge. Though I still think of Loughrigg as a hill. It’ll struggle most days to loose its head in the clouds and thankfully today was looking like one of those days.

There’s a different feel to this walk as it takes a while to get away from the of the town. Walking past the shops on Compston Road, the school, the church in Vicarge Road into the park all full of busy.

Emily desperate to climb anything. Low Pike and Red Screes in the background.

We cross the packhorse bridge in Rothay Park onto the lane and then begin the zig zag climb up to Ivy Crag now following the small people. Checking around to see every one was not giving me one of those “you said it would be an easy walk” looks.  I think everyone was fine. I didn’t want to make anymore promises that would later be used against me should anyone turn round an back out. Jean looked comfortable, in fact more so than Keith, but Keith always had that eye of determination that one has when they come out with someone close to them. Keith joked about getting off his bike and pushing last friday in the moors but what is there to get off when you’re already off. Collapse on the floor I guess in front of your mum? No way.  In no time at all we were onto the fell proper holding gates open for other walkers was now par for the course. Though Emily preferred to just climb over them than to simply open them. No one likes a show off.

Deer Hows

Loughrigg Fell is a mass of mounds and crags, that are great for exploring. There are clear broad paths as well as faint narrow ones that spur off on all directions beckoning you to go and have a look at the view from another vantage point. As we neared the top more people seemed to be out

Small people messing about.

enjoying the hill as we were. All manner of disciplines from casual family walkers to hardened fell runners all impeccably polite stepping to the side if you had a pace over their own. I think Jack’s early attempt at chasing down a fell runner was borderline rude though overshadowed but the comic value. We wondered how far he’d go to keep up with him. He excused himself the humiliation, conveniently distracted by a tree that looked like it was worth climbing. So he let the fell runner off.

Small Fell runners near Black Mire

Already the summit was in view and this came as some surprise to Lesley, she was enjoying this walk, especially as Jack and Emily were so lively and energetic. We took our time though and this is something I felt I needed to work on. Good advise from Lesley. I know I have a default pace which is one that is set to push myself so that I actually feel like I’m exercising rather than walking.
I have a tendency to setting a heart rate that

The Oblitorator…of cairns and chocolate coated condiments.

just puts a little to much space between me and my companions. I think it comes from mountain biking alone for so many years. Just pushing myself without anyone else to consider. It’s a habit I guess and one I should be aware of when I have company. Jack pointed observed one woman who he said was wearing make up to cover the fact that she had red cheeks, blushed by the stiff climb. Funny enough but then went on to remark that another woman didn’t even bother. I don’t know which is the lesser of the two insults but it’s wise to sometimes talk loudly over Jack incase someone takes offense. So we stopped some more and took in the fine views over towards the Coniston Fells and  Langdales, as well as a KitKat, but other chocolate coated biscuits were also available most carried by Jack, a gardian of anything chocolaty though relieving him of them can end up in a fight to the death.

Jean – AKA Keen Jean

All together now – Big Arms for Loughrigg…S.M.A.S.H.ed

A short staircase climb onto Loughrigg summit greets you with a fine stoney plateaux, a trig point and half the worlds populations and his dog. I overhear someone ask a couple of fell runners how long it took them. 15 minutes! Not bad I suppose it only took us an hour and 15 minutes and we were just walking and clarting about. A supreme effort and one worthy of a sit down with some ham sandwiches, at first on the windy side towards Grasmere and then some more on the warmer southern side overlooking Windemere. The best aspect of this walk is the constant surrounding bodies of water you see. Loughrigg Tarn, Elter Water, Windemere, Rydal Water all make up that architypical lakeland walking experience. Little wonder it’s so popular so why would it not be a little crowded on a Sunday when so many are fighting crowds in busy shopping malls. The neighbouring peaks can be seen across Rydal. The lower ones that make up the epic Fairfield Horseshoe. Low Pike and Nab Scar being the ends of the shoe. The mightier Peaks of Dove Crag, Hart Crag, Fairfield and Great Rigg are greyed out today. That’s a walk reserved for those made of sterner stuff and powered by more than crisps and a kitkat. Haribo maybe?

Jack and Emily set off to find a geocache hidden not to far from the summit point and found it easy though again a  little disappointed to not find anything of use to them inside. The rain was beggining to make an appearance from the Langdales darkened clouds prompted a move. So we whipped out the jackets and took our summit photo before heading down the North Bank towards Grasmere and Loughrigg Terrace. This is a fine a walk with a view that lasts.

The drop to Loughrigg Terrace is another thigh trembling descent that winds down on a well built path sturdy enough to cope with the thousands of boots that tread it each year. This of course is where the small people effortlessly accelerate down towards Grasmere. Lesley did her best to chase them down but they were in the zone and out of site. I caught them up just as they were about to descend on the wrong path to Rydal Water simply because that’s where the people infront of them were going.

Loughrigg Cave

Back on track we all bunch up and took the high road contouring the fell above Rydal Water to the very impressive Loughrigg Cave, not a natural cave it is actually created from an old slate quarry blast, but is extremely impressive and even has its own small lake inside and a duck!

Jack and Emily have a look about in the cave then we drop down North East to Pelter Bridge were they are treated to an Ice Cream again. This is becoming customary at the end of their walk. But they did great and Emily has vowed never to be carried again on a walk, but then added “unless it about 10 miles” then she might. The last leg is a saunter along the lane admiring some impressive properties to return to Rothay Bridge and into Ambleside. Having walked 6 miles, exploring this fell everyone was pretty much done so once more made for the

nearest tea shop, the Chocolate Bar on Millans Park for some fine tea and hot chocolate on a big sofa. A cracking walk and for me I’ll be back for a C.R.A.S.H. tour of this fell though maybe I’ll savour this one for a weekday when it’s a little more bike friendly.

Fancy a scramble up Halls Fell Ridge onto Saddleback in May?

Believe it!

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One thought on “Loughrigg Fell from Ambleside – Ambleside – Easter Sunday 8th April – Week 3

  1. My first SMASH outing missed, & it looked like another beauty!
    A great article db, and some brilliant snaps. You even
    managed to get Keen Jean doing “chicken arms”! Maybe Big Arms on the next one.
    Roll on May Bank Holiday and the awesome Blencathra!

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